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What It Means If You're Pregnant And Want Sex

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What It Means If You're Pregnant And Horny
Health And Wellness, Sex

It's not as uncommon as you think.

When you're pregnant, it may seem like you’ll feel uncomfortable forever. You may also not want to get up close and personal with those around you, but for many women, that couldn't be further from the truth.

It is really very common to feel pregnant and horny when you're expecting, although sometimes women feel somewhat uncomfortable, especially with sex during pregnancy. This is due to a larger abdomen, but it does give you an excuse to try fun, new positions.

And if you are feeling horny, go with it. "In low risk pregnancies, women and men can safely enjoy sex," says Dr Sherry A. Ross, Women’s Health Expert and Author of she-ology.

"You may not be in the mood, and your partner may be afraid to engage in it with you, but the good news is that vaginal sex is safe during pregnancy, unless you are having pregnancy related problems and your health care provider has informed you otherwise," Dr. Ross advises. That also means most sexual positions are safe, so your only limitation may be the discomfort that some positions can cause as your pregnancy progresses. 

It's perfectly fine and normal to want to have sex during pregnancy, but what are the reasons women feel more aroused when they're expecting?

RELATED: What's Safe (And What's NOT) When It Comes To Sex While Pregnant

1. Hormones

There are all sorts of hormonal things going on while pregnant. Of course, you may be horny, so if you are in the mood and your partner is as well, why not go for it? Pregnancy also means fatigue and nausea, so you may not be in the mood next week. That means you should capture the moment now.

2. Emotional closeness

In females, having a sex drive is quite complex and is driven by far more than hormones.

“If a pregnant woman is feeling sexually amorous, it likely means she is in love with her partner, feels safe, and wants validation that her feelings are reciprocal,” advises Felice Gersh, M.D., an award-winning OB/GYN.

"You may have heard that some women feel much more sexual during pregnancy, but that has not been my experience," says Dr. Ross. "In fact, the issue I most deal with relating to sex during pregnancy is a definite lack of interest, sometimes for the whole nine months and beyond."

For most women, sex and intimacy issues may vary with each new trimester. According to Dr. Ross, "During pregnancy a majority of pregnant women prefer the intimacy and closeness of cuddling and kissing with their partners over sexual intercourse. As with any sexual encounter, good communication and respect for emotional and psychological boundaries has to be a priority for you and your partner."

3. Physical needs

For women, sexual feelings are very intermixed with feelings of love.

According to Gersh, “A pregnant woman seeking a sexual encounter is seeking physical closeness, wants to feel that she is still desired and desirable, and wants to express her love and provide pleasure to the partner she adores, and receive positive vibes back!”

But though having sex during pregnancy is just fine, there are a few situations in which you should not do so and may involve consulting your doctor.

These situations include bleeding issues and pregnancy complications. “If you have a placenta previa (a placenta covering the cervix), or you have had significant bleeding issues, and your obstetrician has said to avoid intercourse; or if you are on medications for preterm labor,” warns Dr. Mary Jane Minkin.

But most folks don't seem to have any problems and can have sex right up until they go into labor!

Says Minkin, “Many obstetricians and midwives will encourage women who go beyond their due date to have sex. It is felt that the seminal fluid, which contains a substance known as prostaglandin (yes, found in the prostate gland), can help stimulate labor,” says Dr. Minkin.

RELATED: 9 Crazy Things You Never Knew About Pregnancy Sex


Aly Walansky is a NY-based lifestyles writer. Her work appears in dozens of digital and print publications regularly. Visit her on Twitter or email her at alywalansky@gmail.com.